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The Nicene Creed as the Pledge of Allegiance

An Icon of the Nicene Symbol

In the Christian view of life, our primary allegiance is never to any nation, state, or tribe, but to the Body of Christ.  The Church is not merely a subset of society or a private organization through which Christians pursue their private spiritual lives, it is the “royal priesthood” (using 1 Peter’s language) of God’s people called out of the world for the sake of the world. Rodney Clapp describes this eloquently in his book on country music and Christian identity in America:

In Christian profession, Gentiles are called into covenantal relation with the God of Israel, the true and living God, through and by Jesus of Nazareth, himself a Jew and indeed the long-awaited Messiah. Drawing and adopting Gentiles into the commonwealth of Israel, Jesus Christ creates “one new humanity in place of the two” (Eph. 2:15). So for the baptized, nothing can be more basic or more significant than their baptism. In baptism, “There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus” (Gal. 3:27-28). Just as immigrants or “aliens” from another country may be “naturalized” and become citizens of a new country, baptism “naturalizes” the Gentile, incorporates him or her into the body of the Jew Jesus Christ, and grants him or her citizenship in the “commonwealth of Israel.” In the granting of this citizenship, baptism entails nothing less profound than entrance into a new creation, the assumption of a new humanity, a dying to the old self and its identity and a regeneration to a new self and identity (2 Cor. 5:17; Rom. 6:4). Nothing can more basically or comprehensively define the Christian than baptism. Membership in the worldwide body of Christ constitutes the Christian’s highest loyalty, his or her central allegiance.

Clapp goes on to describe how, a few months after September 11, a couple visited his parish for a number of weeks. Upon visiting with the priest, they only exhibited one major concern.  American identity, the said, was somewhat lacking in the church’s services.  Why not affirm the virtues of citizenship, sing patriotic hymns, or share the Pledge of Allegiance during worship? The pastor mentioned that each Sunday they do indeed pray for the country and its leaders, and then concluded, “And we do say the pledge of allegiance – the church’s pledge of allegiance. It’s called the Nicene Creed.” (122-123)

We’ve explored previously why the Nicene Creed is the ancient, ecumenical confession of common apostolic faith of choice for Christians across time and space.  But I quite like this image of the Nicene(-Constantinopolitan) Creed as not merely the most unifying and basic statement of Christian faith, but as the pledge of allegiance for the Church herself.

Does your church use the Nicene Creed or other statements of faith? Would another choice be better for our “pledge of allegiance?” Leave a  comment below – and don’t forget to subscribe by entering your email address to the right!

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Sentimentality Kills

In Rodney Clapp’s eclectic little book spanning the life and work of Johnny Cash, country music, American culture, and Christian identity he tackles the sentimentality that he believes is at the heart of ecclesial degeneration in America today:

“Because idolatry is the most destructive of sinful conditions, the greatest danger to the true faithfulness of the American church comes not from without but from within. That danger is not persecution or victimization or accusations of hypocrisy, but our own all-too-easy tendency to sentimentalize our faith. To sentimentalize the faith is to instrumentalize it, to make it a tool of our ambitions, our comfort, and our security. Sentimentalization is mild-mannered idolatry, sin sweetened and trivialized. Sentimentality kills vital faith with bland complacency.” (60)

My teacher, Stanley Hauerwas, once wrote,”The great enemy of the church today is not atheism but sentimentality.” (The Hauerwas Reader, p. 526) He wrote a blurb on the back of Clapp’s book, and  I imagine he would agree with Clapp’s assessment.

What he describes as sentimentalization is all over North American protestantism. Many of the regnant forms of preaching and worship that pastors are encouraged to adopt are designed to comfort rather than convict, to sell self-actualization rather than exhort cruciform living.  Sentimentalization is the cross reduced to a decoration made of diamonds and silver; discipleship reduced to Instagram Bible verses; asceticism sacrificed on the altar of low expectations – it is Christian faith made into a series of Precious Moments figurines.

Sentimentality is a milquetoast approach to faith designed to be unobtrusive and inoffensive.  But a gospel that does not offend is no gospel; the Word brings not peace but a sword, and divides sinew from flesh. (Matthew 10:34, Hebrews 4:12) It is the kind of Christian life a marketer would design to sell to middle class Americans with overstuffed lives and underdeveloped souls.

Sentimentality is killing us.

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